Page 14 - Survival Guide

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In those eight years I did things like writing so lightly that teachers couldn't
read enough to see my answers were wrong, and misbehaving to get thrown out on
purpose and avoid having to read out loud. At home I yelled at my poor mother,
threw my books around the house, even went as far as stabbing myself with
pencils to get out of doing my homework! The early signs were there, but the
people around me at that time weren't adequately trained to recognize learning
differences.
I was also the biggest kid in my class and interested mostly in sports, so to my
teachers and classmates I was simply a "dumb jock". That's all there was to it.
And the more they believed that label, the more I accepted it.
It
even made sense
to me; I didn't know I had an
L.D"
so how could I know I wasn't dumb?
And that's where the counting tiles routine came into play. To me, it was
better to be "disinterested" than to be "dumb," so I just acted like I didn't care. But
I did. I started to believe that I was dumb, and I cared big-time. By accepting the
label people placed on me, I began the cycle of frustration and self-doubt that
would soon define my high school years, and eventually spoil my college years.
It
took me a long time to learn this. Just because certain skills and subjects
don't come as easily to you as they do to other kids does not mean you're dumb.
You are as smart as you believe you are. The earlier you accept that, the better.
DON'T BELIEVE "THEM."
You
ARE NOT YOUR LIMITATIONS.
DON'T LABEL YOURSELF!
DON'T SHAME YOURSELF!
DON'T SCAR YOURSELF!
No one can make you feel inferior without your consent.
- Eleanor Roosevelt
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